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Easy to Make Dinner With Crab Legs

by Kathryn Hatter, studioD

Expose your children to culinary adventures to broaden their appreciation of foods. Seafood including crab legs can be a dinner adventure for your family, with your kids exploring new tastes and textures in menu items. Not only are they delicious, but you can also enjoy an easy-to-make dinner with crab legs.

Choose the Crab Legs

Select your crab legs carefully to make sure you're getting the best seafood. King and snow crab legs are often in grocery store seafood sections. The crab legs should never smell fishy -- pure salty seawater is the only scent you should detect from the crab legs. Touch the legs, if possible, to make sure they feel firm. The Cooking 101 website recommends buying frozen crab legs for the freshest seafood.

Prepare the Crab

Baking crab legs is the most simple preparation method. Wrap them in aluminum foil with a little vent for steam to escape. Bake frozen crab legs for about 15 minutes at 450 degrees and thawed crab legs for about 7 minutes. You could also microwave frozen crab legs by wrapping them in a damp paper towel and cooking them at 50 percent power for five minutes.

Tasty Sides

Keep the sides light, because crab legs are so light and tasty themselves. Serve the cooked crab legs with drawn butter, if you desire. Try rice pilaf and tossed spinach salad with creamy dressing to round out the meal. Another option is a fettuccine with herbed olive oil and raw vegetables with ranch dip. Crusty French bread would also complement the crab legs deliciously.

Eating Crab Legs

Be prepared to help your youngsters extract the crab meat from the legs. Some people use nutcrackers to crack the shells, while others pry the shells apart with butter knives. You might just be able to separate the shells with your fingers and scoop out the meat with a fork. A sharp picker can help you pull the meat out of the crab legs, but it might be best if parents perform this job.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

Photo Credits

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