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Easter Crafts With Egg Cartons for Toddlers

by Penelope Longfellow, studioD

Egg cartons make the perfect holder for dyed eggs at Easter time, of course. However, empty egg cartons also contain a world of possibilities for your craft-making toddler. Celebrate this springtime holiday of new beginnings by transforming an ordinary container into Easter objects like eggs, baskets, bunnies and bouquets. With your assistance, toddlers can upcycle a typically discarded item into a fun craft for the holiday.

Carton Eggs

Flip the typical purpose of an egg carton on its head by making eggs out of cartons. Use scissors to trim off the lid and closing flap from a carton and discard these pieces. Cut six pairs of adjoining egg cups from the remaining tray, and trim along the edges of each pair to create smooth edges. Have your toddler fold a set of adjoining cups together to form a single egg shape and wrap a strip of colored electrical tape around the middle to seal it closed. Decorate the striped carton egg as desired with toddler-friendly crafting materials, such as crayons, stickers or washable paint. If desired, fill the eggs with goodies prior to taping closed and hide the finished eggs as part of an Easter hunt.

Mini Easter Baskets

Transform an egg carton into tiny, toddler-friendly Easter baskets. Use scissors to trim off the top of the carton, as well as the closing flap, and discard both. Cut the remaining carton into its single egg cups, each of which will become a basket. Provide your toddler with age-appropriate crafting materials to decorate the egg cups, such as washable markers or paint, and stickers. While waiting for the markers or paint to dry, help your toddler fashion a basket handle with a group of three pipe cleaners. Lay the pipe cleaners alongside one another, making sure they are flush, and twist them together multiple times. Bend the handle into an arc shape. Use the pointed end of a pencil to poke two holes near the top edge of the egg cup, opposite each other. Insert one end of the twisted pipe cleaner handle into each hole and cinch closed. Fill the finished basket with a dyed Easter egg or other Easter treats.

Easter Bouquet

Use scissors to divide the bottom portion of an egg carton into individual cups. Starting at the outside edge of each cup and cutting inward, create "petals" around the circumference to make a flower. Allow your toddler to decorate the flower with age-appropriate craft materials, such as washable markers, watercolor paints, and washable glitter glue. Poke the sharp end of a pencil through the center, or base, of the flower. Help your toddler poke a green pipe cleaner through the hole and cinch closed. Twist a second green pipe cleaner into the shape of leaves and add it to the center of the green stem. Make several egg carton flowers and place in a glass canning jar to create an Easter springtime bouquet.

Bunnies and Chicks

Help your toddler create a dozen of Easter's quintessential mascots, bunnies and chicks, from an egg carton. Cut the carton bottom into twelve separate egg cups, discarding the leftover material. Provide your child with yellow washable paint for the chicks, and white or pastel washable paints for the bunnies. Flip each cup upside down to paint it a single, solid color and allow it to dry. Help your child apply a pair of self-adhesive googly eyes to each cup. To complete the chicks, glue on yellow tail feathers with craft glue, as well as a beak and a pair of chick fit cut from orange construction paper. For the bunnies, glue on a cotton ball tail, small pink pom-pom nose, and bunny ears and feet cut from white construction paper. With washable markers, help your toddler add finishing touches to the bunnies, including mouths, whiskers and ear details.

About the Author

Penelope Longfellow has been writing professionally since 2001. She holds a graduate certificate in writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Longfellow's work has appeared at Change.org and in "Cape Fear Parent" magazine.

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