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Duties & Responsibilities of a Computer Technician

by Linda Ray

Computer technicians typically work in support positions, taking care of users’ computer problems. They work anywhere from the backroom of a large corporation to the front help lines for computer manufacturers and software companies. Every industry needs computer techs in some capacity. In 2010, they made a median income of $46,260, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Maintain Skills

You may not need a degree to land a computer technician job, although some companies may require a bachelor’s degree in computer science or at least network certifications. One of your primary duties however, is to keep up with changes that affect your company’s IT systems. You’ll be involved in everything from installing new systems to troubleshooting and repairing existing networks. Ongoing training may occur at work, through the network provider, or at off-site seminars and workshops.

Install

A big part of your job is to install new hardware and software. In addition to working for an IT department in one company under the supervision of the network administrator, you also could find work with a sub-contractor who installs and troubleshoots network systems for small businesses. Computer techs also work independently, since many small business owners and individuals need assistance installing and setting up new computer systems.

On Call

In a big company, the IT department is on call for a wide range of issues that employees have with their computers. While you may be able to analyze those issues from your own computer with network access, you may have to interact with other users throughout the company on a regular basis. The job calls for a significant amount of patience with users who don’t understand the technology the company employs, but who do rely on that technology every day to do their jobs. Similarly, as a freelancer or outside contractor, you can expect to be on call for your clients.

Advise

When you work as a computer tech on a help line, you have to listen to your callers’ issues and try to figure out how to solve their problems. You may have to prompt callers with the appropriate questions to get to the bottom of their problems. At other times, you may find yourself on the line with a frustrated and angry customer. It’s your job to remain polite and turn the call over to a supervisor if you can’t calm the caller down. Once you’ve figured out the problem, then it’s your duty to walk the caller through the procedures he needs to perform to solve his problem.

About the Author

Linda Ray is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years reporting experience. She's covered business for newspapers and magazines, including the "Greenville News," "Success Magazine" and "American City Business Journals." Ray holds a journalism degree and teaches writing, career development and an FDIC course called "Money Smart."

Photo Credits

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