our everyday life

How to Get Your Dress to Not Stick to Your Tights

by Zoe Maletta

When cooler weather comes, nothing pulls together a cute dress like a pair of tights and your favorite boots, heels or flats. It's an easy style that comes with a bonus -- your legs not only stay warm, but they also look lean. However, you can thank static electricity for one lonely caveat to your favorite wardrobe duo. Instead of swirling or swinging, your dress can cling to your tights, bunch up and threaten to spoil your confident catwalk around town. By enlisting the help of a few simple steps, you'll soon be static-cling free and back to rocking your winter-weather look.

Prevention

Add one-fourth cup of white vinegar to your washing machine's fabric softener dispenser before washing your dress, tights and other items prone to static cling. Skip your normal softener and dryer sheet routine.

Hang your garments to dry outside or inside on a clothes-drying rack to help prevent static cling in the first place. Since static cling occurs in extremely dry conditions -- like a dryer -- this option helps to reduce the problem of your dress sticking to your tights.

Shake it up. When you must use the dryer, pull your dress and other items out of the dryer immediately after they finish drying. Shake each item individually before folding, ironing or hanging back in your closet; this simple step keeps static electricity from settling in.

Cure

Apply lotion evenly to both your hands. While wearing your tights, rub your moist hands down your legs.

Spray hairspray -- or a store-bought anti-static spray -- up your dress and down your tights. Your clothes won't get sticky and you'll see immediate results.

Pack dryer sheets in your purse or bag. When static cling strikes, grab a dryer sheet and rub it down your legs for a quick -- and aromatic -- fix.

Items you will need
  • White vinegar
  • Clothes-drying rack
  • Lotion
  • Hairspray
  • Dryer sheets

About the Author

Zoe Maletta writes on a variety of topics with special focus on leadership, careers and small business management. Professionally writing since 2007, her many publishers include "The Houston Chronicle", "Global Post Careers" and "The Nest." When she's not writing, Maletta enjoys making memories with family and participating in church ministry. Maletta holds both a B.S.and an M.A. in counseling.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images