our everyday life

The Disadvantages of Being a Single Parent & Raising a Child

by Victoria Thompson

A single parent could feel like a mouse racing on a wheel, where she's continually running trying to maintain a proper household and raise healthy children. Emotions may run high in a single parent home as both parent and child struggle to navigate this path. There are numerous challenges that the parent has to face, but it's important to take them one step at a time.

Economic Stress

The single parent may feel stress being the sole financial supporter. If you are newly single, you may have to adjust to living on less money than you are accustomed. This can result in juggling bills and possibly working more than one job. Working multiple jobs leaves little time to spend with your child, which could result in the parent feeling guilty.

Too Many Tasks

Being overloaded with too many tasks can lead to feeling overwhelmed or out of control. After working an eight-hour job, the parent must then return home to complete chores, cook dinner and spend quality time with her child. There is no one to share these responsibilities, so everything rests with her. If anything is lacking, the parent may feel guilty that she cannot do everything perfectly. Being overwhelmed could lead to mental and physical fatigue, causing tension within the home. It's important that the single parent find a few minutes in each day to take time for herself or ask family and friends to lend a helping hand.

Being Lonely

Making all the decisions in the house, with no one to consult, causes loneliness to set in. The single parent does not have a partner to calm her after a long day at work or to talk to about the kids' day. A single parent feels as though all the work falls on her with no relief, suggests Susie McGee, M.Ed of Love to Know.com. Loneliness can cause the single parent to feel withdrawn socially if she spends a majority of the time with her child. She may not wish to spend this quality time away from her family.

Negative Children's Behavior

Each child is unique and may handle the difficulties of being raised by a single parent in a different way. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that boys in middle childhood may become aggressive, while girls of this age tend to become more withdrawn in contrast. If the father is absent from the home, the son tries to fill his role. This makes it harder for the mother to remain in authority. The daughter tries to fill the void when a mother is missing by becoming the homemaker and caretaker of other younger siblings. Both scenarios could be deemed harmful, by creating resentment and robbing sons and daughters of their childhoods.

About the Author

Based in North Carolina, Victoria Thompson has taught middle school for the past 15 years. She holds a Masters of Education in middle school instruction from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She teaches English daily to English as a second language students.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images