our everyday life

Different Ways to Cook Canned Corn

by Scott Damon

Canned corn is a nutritious staple of the American diet that provides 133 calories, only 2 grams of fat and 4 grams of protein for every cup served. Canned corn is found on virtually every supermarket shelf throughout the country, making it easy to purchase and serve as a side dish with any meal. While there are a myriad of canned corn recipes that either feature the vegetable or use it as one of many ingredients, there are only a handful of ways to cook canned corn.

On the Range

After emptying the contents of the canned corn into a sauce pan, place it on the stop top over high heat. Cover the sauce pan for three to five minutes until it comes to a boil, stirring intermittently. Allow the corn to cool for about five minutes, plate and serve to your guests.

Microwave Method

After emptying the can of corn into a microwave-safe dish, place it inside the unit on high for two to three minutes until it's piping hot. Remove from the microwave and stir with a spoon for about 30 seconds as it cools. The corn can be served in the microwave-safe dish. Place a trivet beneath the dish as it may retain heat even as the corn cools.

Broiler Roasting

While many people roast corn that's still on the cob, you can also roast canned corn quite easily. After draining away the excess water, place the corn in a single layer on a baking sheet. Insert the baking sheet in the oven about 6 inches under the broiler. Roast the corn for about two to three minutes, or until the skin exhibits a golden brown hue. Remove the roasted corn from the oven, allow it to cool slightly and serve to your guests. If your broiler has settings, adjusting it to low will allow you to expand the cooking time to about five minutes and reduce the risk of burnt corn kernels.

Foil Packet Grilling

Canned corn lends itself to foil packet cooking, in which meat or vegetables are placed in a foil packet, sealed and then placed over either direct or indirect heat. After emptying your canned corn onto a piece of foil, create a packet by placing another piece of foil over the first layer and sealing the edges. The foil packet can be placed over direct heat on the grill if you want it to cook it in about five minutes, or indirect heat if you want a slower cooking time of 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from the grill with tongs, plate and serve.

About the Author

Scott Damon is a Web content specialist who has written for a multitude of websites dating back to 2007. Damon covers a variety of topics including personal finance, small business, sports, food and travel, among many others.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images