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What Are the Different Types of Facials Available at Spas?

by Nakita Rowell-Stevens, studioD

While a trip to the spa is a luxurious, pampering experience, choosing the best facial treatments to match your lifestyle and skin ensures long-term benefits beyond one spa day. Everyone's skin is not created equal; therefore, spas offer a variety of spa treatments to meet various skin-care needs, some of which are quite nontraditional.

Antiaging Facials

Aging skin inspires many to invest in spa facials. As the skin ages, proper skin care becomes more crucial. Spas employ expert aestheticians to administer treatments like alpha hydroxy and collagen facials. Both of these facials utilize the traditional cleanse, tone, steam and moisturize method of the basic facial. Alpha hydroxy is a natural, topical cream that is applied to fight the aging process. Its natural properties improve skin's natural pigmentation, help the skin rebound from sun damage and exfoliates for brighter, more youthful skin. Collagen facials utilize the protein collagen to tighten the skin and slow the aging process. Once the skin is cleansed and exfoliated, collagen cream is massaged into the face and sits as a mask for 30 minutes. The result is tight, supple, radiant skin.

Antioxidant Facials

Skin is exposed to thousands of free radicals daily ranging from sunlight to your own sweat. Spas offer antioxidant facials to protect the face from free radical damage. Free radicals may seem harmless because they are so abundant, but many are the source of disease and infections like cancer. These facials utilize antioxidants like vitamin C and green tea to rejuvenate and lift dull skin. Antioxidant facials primarily benefit people who are outdoors often, active and prone to free radical exposure. Acne is often another byproduct of free radicals. Spas offer specialized facials for acne-prone skin. Spa acne treatments typically consist of enzyme or glycolic acid exfoliation to break down dead skin cells and blocked pores, vapor mist to open pores, deep pore pimple extractions, and anti-inflammatory acne masks.

Chocolate Facials

Chocolate satisfies more than the insatiable sweet tooth; it has become a tool to treat the skin. Dark chocolate, in particular, has been noted for its antioxidant properties aiding in heart health and lowering blood pressure. Epictechin, the antioxidant found in dark chocolate, has also been linked to the reduction in wrinkles and sun damage. Chocolate also contains vitamins such as iron, potassium and magnesium. Cocoa butter, a component of chocolate, is also a great natural moisturizer. This nontraditional facial treatment is growing in popularity among spas; plus, you can eat the mask.

Gemstone Facials

Sapphires and amethysts were made to adorn more than your ring finger. Precious gems have actually made their way into the spa, and not for a hot stone massage. These stones are being used on the face. Gemstone facials are meant to manipulate points in the lymphatic system, activating healing properties. How the stones are used varies depending upon the spa. Some spas use astrology as the guide to their stone treatments. For example, if you were born in February, amethyst would be the gem of choice for your facial treatment. The Eurostone facial isolates chakra points in the face, the energy centers in the lymphatic system, using hematite stones and precious gems. This method stimulates, circulates and detoxifies the skin and heals the body. Spa facials have evolved from the standard cleanse, tone, mask and moisturize. As more healing minerals are discovered, the choice of spa facials to benefit the skin becomes unlimited.

About the Author

Richmond, Virginia resident Nakita Rowell-Stevens has been writing articles in business and entertainment since 2002. Her writing experience spans from feature coverage with local area newspapers such as "The Daily Tar Heel" and "The Richmond Free Press" to writing for ABC Television affiliates. Rowell-Stevens holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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