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How to De-Stress Your Wife After a Hard Day

by Emily DeYoung, studioD

Many women find it difficult to unwind after a hard day. With demands on the homefront, often the day's challenges simply morph into those of a different nature as the day winds down. When this happens it can be increasingly difficult to decompress by nightfall, making women feel as if they are on a treadmill that rarely stops. Because it stands to reason that everyone in the home is happier when the lady of the house is relaxed, consider some ways to help your wife de-stress after a hard day.

Take over at dinnertime. After a long day, it can be frustrating for women to hear the words, "What's for dinner?" Tell your wife in advance that you will be handling all of the details, and do just that. Whether you cook the meal yourself or order in her favorite healthy dish, take it all off her plate -- pun intended -- from preparation to clean up. And remember: When in doubt, take her out!

Let her vent. Women tend to think aloud when working through frustration. At the end of a difficult day, invite your wife to talk things through -- and simply listen. This may be easier said than done, as your natural inclination might be to offer suggestions or ways to "fix" her problems. She may, however, simply want to be heard. Acknowledge her feelings and allow her to talk until she's gotten it all out. No solutions required.

Pamper her. Many women put themselves last at home, rarely carving out opportunities for relaxation. Consider what would help your wife decompress and set the stage for it. Draw her a warm, lavender bath with a glass of wine or chamomile tea. Set up a quiet space where she can read or listen to music. If she enjoys television but rarely gets to indulge in "her" shows, put a pillow under her head and hand over the remote.

Promote exercise. One of the best strategies for reducing stress is to get off the couch and move it. Join your wife in physical activity, be it jogging or strength training. Get outside and go for a bike ride or a leisurely walk. Or, grab a ball and simply make a game out if it -- just remember, it's her choice. If you can't join her, manage things at home so she venture out and get physical.

About the Author

Emily DeYoung is a staff writer for "Touched By Cancer Magazine." Formerly an instructor and counselor in higher education, she holds a master's degree in counselor education. DeYoung is also a certified interpreter of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

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