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How to Describe Yourself in One Word for an Interview Question

by Gina Scott, studioD

Acing an interview involves preparing yourself beforehand to answer any type of question. To put you on your toes, potential employers may ask you to describe yourself in a single word. Have some ideas handy of what to say before you step into the meeting. Think about what you're good at and how other people would describe you. From these descriptions, come up with the single best word that fits you and may top the list of what your employer is looking for in a new hire.


Employers invest considerable amounts of money into getting new hires up to speed. One thing that irritates an employer is investing in an employee and having him quit for no good reason. Describing yourself as loyal and able to follow through with your commitments is one route you can take. Give examples in your work life where you stuck with a company through hard times or even give examples from your personal life, such as standing by and helping a friend who has been ill.


Words such as likable or good-spirited describe someone who gets along well with others. It may feel a little awkward to say that people are drawn to you -- but if it's true, you can reveal this information in a humble way. If you're the type of person that people come to for advice or gravitate toward at a social event, you probably have a positive spirit. If you use a word such as positive to describe this quality, it sums up the likability factor in a more neutral way.


Most employers are thrilled to have hard-working employees. Hard-working can be used to describe traits such as ambitious, focused or determined. Depending on which word suits you best, if you're hard-working make sure your employer knows it by describing yourself this way during the interview. Give examples of how you're not afraid to pitch in and perhaps even perform tasks that are not part of your job description.


At the end of the day, companies are in business to make money. When issues need to be overcome, your creativity pays off. Following procedure is also an important quality but if you are known to be industrious and can think outside the box, emphasize this to an employer. Especially in leadership positions, companies count on their workers to come up with solutions to get the job done and to please customers. If you're creative, give an example of how you arrived at a last-minute solution or devised a way to meet an impossible deadline.

About the Author

Based in the Midwest, Gina Scott has been writing professionally since 2008. She has worked in real estate since 2004 and has expertise in pop culture and health-related topics. She has also self-published a book on how to overcome chronic health conditions. Scott holds a Master of Arts in higher-education administration from Ball State University.

Photo Credits

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