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How to Date a Twin

by Lucie Westminster

Twins share a unique and special bond with one another. In 2011, over 130,000 twins were born in the United States, according to The National Organization of Mothers of Twins Clubs, Inc. If you are dating one of these individuals, you need to carefully negotiate the special considerations of bonding with and including the twin in your own relationship. If you do, you will win the heart of the special sibling and improve your relationship with your significant other.

Include his twin in activities, when appropriate. Invite him to double date when you head to the bowling alley or a movie with your significant other. Include him in holiday celebrations like Christmas and Hanukkah. It's OK to have time alone with your boyfriend without his twin, but realize that the bond they share is a strong one and needs to be considered when planning activities.

Accept the fact that she will sometimes choose her sibling over you. Your significant other isn't trying to say you are not important by going to the mall with her twin sister and not asking you to come along. Instead, she is simply looking for time to spend with her twin.

Treat your boyfriend and his twin as individuals, even though they may be very much alike. Just because they shared a womb and possibly look the same doesn't mean they share a personality. Avoid treating the twin, especially if they are identical, the same. Your relationship is only with the person you are dating, and that person should be the focus of your energy.

Build a friendly relationship with your boyfriend's twin. Because they share a close bond, if your lover's twin approves of you, your lover will likely think better of you, as well. Invite the sibling over for one-on-one time and cook a meal or play a game of miniature golf together. This gives you the chance to get to know each other on a more personal level without your significant other around. But no matter how close the two twins are, remember that dating one is not the same as dating both.

Tip

  • Talk to their parents to help you focus on the differences between the twins.

About the Author

Based in Texas, Lucie Westminster has been a writer and researcher since 1975. Her work has been published in journals such as "Psychological Reports" and "Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior." Westminster's interests include developmental psychology, children, pets and crafting. She holds a Ph.D. in psychology from Miami University.

Photo Credits

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