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How to Cut a T-Shirt Into a Tank Top With Big Arm Holes

by S.R. Becker, studioD

Cutting an old T-shirt into a tank top can breathe new life into a favorite piece. If you find T-shirts too blocky in shape or too hot in the summer months, consider crafting one into a tank you can wear to the gym or even to the club. You don't have to have any sewing skills to make the most of your wardrobe staples, in fact this project is quick and easy even for beginners.

Lay a T-shirt flat on a hard surface or cutting mat. Spread out the shirt with the front facing up, removing any wrinkles by smoothing the shirt with your hands.

Measure 1 1/2 inches out from the neckband across the top of the shoulder. From the sleeve seam in the armpit, measure 1 1/2 inches down the side of the shirt. Mark these spots with tailor's chalk, and repeat on the other side of the shirt.

Start cutting from the chalk mark near the shoulder and gradually curve to meet the mark under the armpit. Fold the shirt in half and use your marks and the already cut side as guides to cut the other arm off the shirt.

Cut off the neckband of the shirt just below the seam. If you want a deeper neck, cut further down. For a V-neck in the front, cut diagonally from the top of each shoulder to where you would like the bottom of the V to fall.

Cut off the hem of the shirt just above the seams. Stretch all the cut edges by pulling sections in opposite directions all the way around. This will make them curl in, hiding the rough-cut edge. Wear your shirt as-is or wash it in the washing machine and dry it in the dryer to make the edges curl even more. Whatever heat setting and detergent you prefer will work.

Items you will need
  •  Ruler
  •  Tailor's chalk
  •  Fabric scissors
  •  Cutting mat (optional)
  •  Washing machine (optional)
  •  Dryer (optional)
  •  Laundry detergent (optional)

About the Author

S.R. Becker is a certified yoga teacher based in Queens, N.Y. She has a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing and has worked as a writer and editor for more than 15 years. Becker often writes for "Yoga in Astoria," a newsletter about studios throughout New York City.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images