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How to Create a Simple Rhyming Book for Children

by Maria Magher

Rhyming stories aren't just silly and fun -- they also help kids learn to read more quickly because they create something called phonological awareness, which is a fancy way of saying "an understanding of sound in language." Reading rhyming books is one way to develop this skill, but a more fun activity that will help develop it more quickly is to create your own rhyming books together.

Cut several pieces of construction paper to the size you want your book to be.

Write a rhyming sound -- such as -at, -ing or -in -- at the top of each page of your book.

Brainstorm with your child to come up with rhyming words for each of the sounds. Write down the words on the page with pens, markers or crayons. Come up with as many words as you can -- even words that aren't "real." If Dr. Seuss can write about a wocket in his pocket, you can write about a "zat" or a "lin."

Draw pictures to go with the words on the page. You can draw the picture right next to the word, or you can create a kind of collage on the page. Be creative and have fun.

Create a cover for the book. Think of a fun title like "Johnny's Amazing Book of Rhymes" or "Susie's Awesome Rhyming Words." Draw some cover art to complement the title.

Add fun extras like an author page or a dedication page. This extra step will give your little one a sense of ownership and pride, which will inspire him to read it more and to learn more about rhymes later.

Stack the pages together and punch holes along the left side.

Tie the book together through the holes with yarn or twine.

Show off the book to family and friends, and read it together often.

Items you will need
  • Construction paper or card stock
  • Pens
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Yarn or twine

Tips

  • Have fun with the decoration. Get out paint, glitter, glue, pipe cleaners and any other craft supplies you'd like to decorate the pages and the cover of the book.
  • Choose large pages to provide plenty of space to decorate.
  • Use metal rings or a binder notebook to bind the book instead of a yarn for easier turning of the pages.

Warning

  • Always supervise your child when working with items like scissors or glue.

About the Author

Maria Magher has been working as a professional writer since 2001. She has worked as an ESL teacher, a freshman composition teacher and an education reporter, writing for regional newspapers and online publications. She has written about parenting for Pampers and other websites. She has a Master's degree in English and creative writing.

Photo Credits

  • Jack Hollingsworth/Photodisc/Getty Images