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How to Create a Club Logo

by Gail Cohen

Nothing brings people with a common goal together like an attention-getting logo. Your club or group may already imagine how its logo will look on signs, a website, T-shirts or as a tattoo. You can create a logo that sends the message to everyone who sees it that you are a proud member of a unique club or organization.

Consider the name of your club when designing your logo. If it already has a visual reference, you'll have a leg up in the logo-creation process. Think about existing clubs like the Lions, Rotary, Toastmasters and Latin Kings. Their logos come to mind easily. Choose images that best reflect your club's name and use them as a springboard to create the design.

Gather design inspiration from other club logos as well as from product boxes, magazine ads, or even buildings. Visit www.logopond.com to peruse some terrific logo examples. When certain logos pop out at you, figure out what it is is about them that makes them so appealing, then borrow those elements to aid your own logo's design. But be cautious about replicating someone else's logo exactly so that you don't get sued.

Prepare rudimentary sketches of logo ideas that best represent your club's mission and goals. Experiment with shapes. Gather some clip art. Cut pictures out of magazines and then trace some of the elements onto a pad of artist's tissue. Alternately, use your computer to do the job by opening your draw program to create and fill in shapes. Import and insert copyright-free clip art or graphics.

When you have at least three backgrounds, add your club's name to the design. Use rub-off type, hand-draw the letters, or set the type on your computer. If your group already uses a specific font, match it as closely as possible with the lettering on your logo. Alternately, experiment with Impact, Arial Black or Gill Sans Ultra Bold. These fonts are common to a variety of software programs.

If a potential design starts getting complex, put it into a photocopier, set it to 75% reduction, and decide if it's still as powerful as the original size. This will keep you focused on only the workable drafts.

Decide where your club logo is going to be used. You may wish to have it made into a uniform patch, put it on a notebook, letterhead or a flyer, or it may become a tattoo on members' bodies. Before you formalize the logo, take samples of the computer- or hand-rendered logo art to the vendor who will be transferring the design to club-related materials.

Decide, with the other members of the club, between the final designs. Share the feedback you received from the vendor(s) you visited. If the group selects your hand-rendered club logo, scan and save it in two sizes--a high-resolution jpeg (300 dpi) for general use and a low-resolution jpeg (72 dpi) for web use. Save any computer-generated final art as a PDF so all club members can use the logo for club-related business.

Items you will need
  • Drawing supplies
  • Design software
  • Printer

About the Author

Based in Chicago, Gail Cohen has been a professional writer for more than 30 years. She has authored and co-authored 14 books and penned hundreds of articles in consumer and trade publications, including the Illinois-based "Daily Herald" newspaper. Her newest book, "The Christmas Quilt," was published in December 2011.

Photo Credits

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