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Crafts Using Aluminum Pans for Kids

by Flora Richards-Gustafson, studioD

The beauty of aluminum pans is that you can give them a new life after you use them for your meals. Crafts for kids that use aluminum pans teach children about reusing items to reduce waste. They also enhance creativity, as this metallic medium offers a break from paper and crayons.

Stepping Stones

Garden stones are inexpensive and simple for kids of all ages to make. Use a round aluminum pan as the form, as well as materials like cement, marbles and shells. Allow each child to design an individualized stepping stone. This is an ideal opportunity to capture a moment in time as your child presses his hands into the cement or writes his name. Add the year in an available space and take pictures of the stepping stones before setting them in the ground.

Musical Instrument

Teach your children about another culture and spark their musical creativity. Using a large aluminum roasting pan and craft supplies like acrylic paints, stickers and glitter, let the kids decorate their own Asian-inspired gong. Transform a stray sock and a dowel into a drumstick. By stapling the rims of two pie pans together and filling them with beans, kids can also create stickless maracas that they can decorate with the same craft materials as the gong.

Shadow Box

Capture memories of a recent trip by transforming a deep, square aluminum pan into a shadow box. Use smaller pans so the kids can create their own individual shadow boxes, or use one large pan if you want to do a collaborative family project. The ideal items for the shadow box are things that capture your kids’ memories of the trip, like maps, postcards, small souvenirs or even an interesting rock that someone found. The kids can even cut out pictures of themselves and stagger them in the shadow box to add dimension. Hang the shadow boxes in the kids’ rooms or on a wall dedicated to memories of special trips.


If your kids are old enough to draw, have them tap into their creative skills with a flat-bottomed aluminum pan and a Japanese chopstick. The end of the chopstick is perfectly shaped for the kids to etch drawings into the bottoms of the pans; all they need to do is add a little pressure. If one of the kids feels unsure about his artistic capabilities, stick a simple drawing into the bottom of the pan that he can trace with the chopstick or a ballpoint pen. The finished etchings make for interesting accessories in the kids’ bedrooms or as part of your backyard décor.

About the Author

Flora Richards-Gustafson has been writing professionally since 2003. She creates copy for websites, marketing materials and printed publications. Richards-Gustafson specializes in SEO and writing about small-business strategies, health and beauty, interior design, emergency preparedness and education. Richards-Gustafson received a Bachelor of Arts from George Fox University in 2003 and was recognized by Cambridge's "Who's Who" in 2009 as a leading woman entrepreneur.

Photo Credits

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