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How to Cook Tilapia With Very Low Calories

by David Coodin, studioD

Serving fatty fish to your kids is an excellent way to give them the protein they need to keep their energy levels up for school. Tilapia, in particular, is also high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can improve memory and brain function. Because tilapia has a mild flavor, however, you might be tempted to marinate it using rich sauces and other high-calorie ingredients. However, this would add calories that offset the health benefits of the fish. By using low-calorie ingredients, make a healthy tilapia meal that your kids will love.

Choose spices to flavor the tilapia. Avoid ingredients that are high in calories, such as brown sugar. Mix together chili powder, garlic powder and some salt for a flavorful blend with some heat. Chop up some garlic and combine with parsley and salt for a more subtle flavor that your kids will enjoy.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Rub the tilapia fillets with a small amount of extra virgin olive oil or white wine vinegar. Dip the fillets in the spices on both sides until they are covered.

Wrap the fillets in tin foil and place them on the baking sheet. Cook the tilapia until it is opaque on the inside. Cook without tin foil if you want a less moist fish with a crunchier outer layer.

Serve the tilapia fillets to your family with a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of pepper. Coat fillets with light salad dressing for a dish that your kids will gobble up. Avoid high-calorie sauces such as ketchup, barbecue sauce or any sauce containing high levels of sugar

Serve veggies on the side to complete the meal without adding calories. Steam asparagus or broccoli to go with cooked tilapia. Make a salad using lettuce, tomato, cucumbers, peppers and onions, and serve it with a light ranch dressing.

Items you will need
  •  Tilapia fillets
  •  Tin foil
  •  Baking pan
  •  Spices
  •  Lemon
  •  Extra virgin olive oil
  •  White wine vinegar

About the Author

David Coodin began working as a writer in 2005, and has been published in "The Walrus." He contributes to various websites, writing primarily in the areas of education and art. Coodin holds a Ph.D. in English literature from York University in Toronto.

Photo Credits

  • Eising/Photodisc/Getty Images