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How to Cook Thin-Cut Breakfast Pork Chops

by M.H. Dyer

Thin-cut pork chops are a tasty breakfast meat, and when cooked properly, the chops remain moist and juicy. There are several ways to cook succulent breakfast pork chops -- the choice is yours and you can't go wrong. The meat is too thin to use a meat thermometer, so be sure the chops are fully cooked on the outside and slightly pink in the middle. Always let the meat rest -- and finish cooking safely -- for three minutes before serving.

Coat thin pork chops with spicy barbecue sauce or a dry rub consisting of salt and pepper with herbs such as rosemary or sage. Place the chops on a hot grill and cook each side for approximately two to three minutes, or until the outside is brown and the inside is slightly pink. Let the chops rest for three minutes, and then serve immediately.

Braise thin pork chops slowly for tender, succulent meat. Season the meat with salt and pepper. Coat a heavy skillet or frying pan with vegetable or olive oil, and then heat the oil and brown both sides of the pork chops. Pour in a small amount of liquid such as apple cider, tomato paste or wine and cover the pan tightly so the liquid doesn't evaporate. Simmer the chops on low heat for one to three hours, or until the meat is tender and fully cooked.

Prepare to saute thin pork chops by heating a small amount of oil in a skillet or frying pan. Add sliced onions and cook them for about 20 minutes, or until the onions are golden brown. Remove the onions from the pan and keep them warm. Sprinkle the pork chops with salt and pepper, and then place the chops in the hot oil and cook them for three to five minutes, or until they are brown on both sides and the inside of the meat displays only a hint of pink. Transfer the chops to a plate and cover them with the sauteed onions. Let the meat rest for three minutes, and then serve.

Items you will need
  • Barbecue sauce or dry rub
  • Heavy skillet or frying pan with lid
  • Salt and pepper
  • Vegetable oil or olive oil
  • Liquid
  • Sliced onions
  • Plate

About the Author

M.H. Dyer began her writing career as a staff writer at a community newspaper and is now a full-time commercial writer. She writes about a variety of topics, with a focus on sustainable, pesticide- and herbicide-free gardening. She is an Oregon State University Master Gardener and Master Naturalist and holds a Master of Fine Arts in creative nonfiction writing.

Photo Credits

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