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How to Cook a Chuck Short Rib

by Irena Eaves, studioD

Chuck short ribs are the meatiest variety of short ribs. Sometimes called arm short ribs, they have excellent marbling and create rich, full-flavored dishes. Although packed with flavor, short ribs can be rather tough, so they should be braised in liquid for several hours to become melt-in-your-mouth tender. As the ribs cook, they release their juices into the braising liquid to create a flavorful sauce to accompany the dish. Try serving braised short ribs over polenta or pasta for a hearty, satisfying meal.

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pat the short ribs dry with paper towels. The ribs must be thoroughly dried to promote even browning and to prevent them from sticking to the pan.

Sprinkle the ribs liberally with salt and pepper.

Heat a few tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat in an oven-safe pot with a lid, like a Dutch oven or cast-iron casserole dish. Brown the ribs on all sides, about 3 to 4 minutes per side. If you have a large amount of ribs, work in batches if necessary.

Remove the ribs from the pot and set aside.

Pour the liquid into the pot and bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits stuck to the bottom on the pan. You'll need about 1 cup of liquid for every pound of ribs. Try using a combination of dry red wine, like Cabernet Sauvignon, and beef or chicken stock. You can also add aromatics to the liquid while it heats, like sliced onion, crushed garlic, bay leaves and whole sprigs of fresh herbs.

Return the ribs to the pot. Transfer the pot to the oven and allow the ribs to braise, flipping them over every 45 minutes or so. Cook the ribs until they are very tender, about 2 1/2 hours total.

Items you will need
  •  Paper towels
  •  Salt and pepper
  •  Oil
  •  Oven-proof pot
  •  Deglazing liquid, like wine or stock
  •  Aromatics


  • Always cook short ribs to a minimum internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit to guarantee safe consumption. To check the temperature, insert a thermometer into the center of the thickest part of the meat.

About the Author

Irena Eaves began writing professionally in 2005. She has been published on several websites including RedPlum, CollegeDegreeReport.com and AutoInsuranceTips.com. Eaves holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism from Boston University.

Photo Credits

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