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How to Console a Crying Newborn

by Kathryn Hatter, studioD

Newborns have few options for communication, so expect to hear a fair amount of crying from your new baby. As you care for your newborn, have some tricks up your sleeve that will enable you to console and calm him. It may help to respond quickly if your little one begins crying because once a newborn becomes frantically upset, it can be difficult to calm him down.

Consider how long it’s been since you last fed your baby to determine if he’s hungry. Breastfeeding newborns need to eat about every 2 to 3 hours and formula-feeding newborns need to eat about every 2 1/2 to 4 hours, states the Sutter Health website. If you haven’t fed your baby within this period, try feeding him.

Change your baby’s diaper. A wet or messy diaper might be the source of the discomfort.

Check to ensure your baby isn’t too hot, too cold or uncomfortable due to clothing. Make any clothing or outfit adjustments necessary to help him feel more comfortable.

Hold your baby while bouncing him gently or swaying rhythmically to help him calm, suggests the American Academy of Pediatrics at Healthy Children.org. You might also rock in a rocking chair or walk slowly around the room while bouncing lightly on your feet. Pat your little one’s back lightly and stroke his head, while talking in a soothing voice.

Play music or white background noise to help soothe your baby, recommends the KidsHealth website. Music or white noise often helps calm fussy babies because they enjoy the sounds.

Give your baby a pacifier to provide additional sucking, even if he’s not hungry. While he sucks, you might also swaddle him snugly in a receiving blanket. Simply wrap the blanket around him to contain his arms and legs and keep him bundled. Many newborns find swaddling comforting, according to the Mayo Clinic website.

Continue consoling your little one, even if the crying doesn’t stop immediately. Sometimes a newborn needs to wind down for sleep.

Items you will need
  •  Pacifier
  •  Receiving blanket


  • If the frequency, duration or intensity of your newborn’s crying concerns you, call your newborn’s physician for advice.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

Photo Credits

  • BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images