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Comfortable Nighttime Sleeping Temperatures

by Kathy Gleason, studioD

Ever checked on your child in the middle of the night only to find she's a sweaty mess, or that her feet are cold as ice? Your toddler or preschooler will sleep better if she's comfortable, so it's only natural to be concerned with whether her room is too hot or cold. Luckily, kids this age may be able to tell you if they're burning up or freezing, so that can help you determine the best temperature for your child's bedroom.

Ideal Temperature

According to the American Pregnancy Association, children's bedrooms should be kept between 65 and 70 degrees for sleeping. This is actually a good sleeping temperature for everyone in your household, adults and children alike. This temperature should allow children to sleep comfortably with just a light cover or blanket.

Checking Your Child

If your kiddo seems restless, it might be time to sneak into his room for a little reconnaissance. Is he sweaty? Are his cheeks red? Is his hair damp? Is he breathing quickly? If this is the case, cool the room as soon as possible. To see if it's too chilly for your tot, feel his hands or the tips of his ears. If they're cold, boost the heat a bit.

Dressing Your Tot for Bed

Dress your preschooler or toddler for bed in roughly the same number of layers that you would wear yourself. Of course, if your child kicks off the covers like a wild animal, consider footie pajamas or a sleep sack to keep her warmer. In warmer weather, cotton pajamas should work underneath. When it's cold, consider something slightly thicker, such as flannel or fleece. You may need to experiment to find what works best for your child -- some kids are naturally hot-natured and vice versa.

Maintaining Room Temperature

If you're concerned that your child's room is warmer or cooler than the rest of your house, buy a room thermometer for your child's room and check it periodically. Some baby monitors also check temperature. If it's too cool, boost the heat a bit, and make sure all heating vents are open. If it's too warm, consider placing a fan in your child's room somewhere out of reach -- it should help cool your tot and keep air circulating. Bonus: the white noise the fan creates may help your angel sleep.

About the Author

Kathy Gleason is a freelance writer living in rural northern New Jersey who has been writing professionally since 2010. She is a graduate of The Institute for Therapeutic Massage in Pompton Lakes, N.J. Before leaving her massage therapy career to start a family, Gleason specialized in Swedish style, pregnancy and sports massage.

Photo Credits

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