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How to Coat Pork Chops With Breadcrumbs

by Caryn Anderson

Whether you're breading your pork chops to prepare them for frying, or simply looking to add a crunchy coating to baked pork chops, the process is an easy way to keep the chops moist while adding flavor and texture. If you're making more than one chop, use one hand to handle all of the wet ingredients and use your other hand only to handle it when it's dry. You can also season your breadcrumbs and use different types of breadcrumbs to change up the flavor and texture of your dish.

Season the pork chops on both sides with salt and black pepper, and then set them aside. Remember, you’ll have an opportunity to add additional seasonings to the breadcrumbs.

Place all-purpose flour in a shallow bowl. Although flouring the chops before you dip them into the liquid mixture isn't entirely necessary, it is standard for the breading procedure and helps the breadcrumbs stick to the pork chop.

Prepare the liquid for dredging your pork chops in a second shallow bowl. This wet layer helps the breadcrumbs really stick to your chops. An egg wash, which is a mixture of water or milk beaten with egg, is probably among the most frequently used concoctions.

Fill a third shallow bowl with your breadcrumbs. You can use standard fine, dry breadcrumbs or panko, which is a coarser, Japanese breadcrumb. Using panko gives you a lighter, crunchier texture than finer breadcrumbs. Other ingredients you could use for your breadcrumbs include crushed crackers, corn flakes, other cereals or fresh breadcrumbs.

Preheat your oven or saute pan. If you are sauteing your pork chop, add some olive oil to the pan and allow it to heat until it shimmers. If you're baking the chops, preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Dip your pork chop in the flour, coating both sides and shaking off any extra flour. Then dip the chop in the liquid mixture. Press each side of the pork chop into your breadcrumbs, coating the chop thoroughly.

Cook the chop until the outside is golden, flipping it halfway through your cooking time. This could take around 10 minutes, if you're frying them or 20 to 30 minutes if you're baking the chops. A meat thermometer should read at least 145 F when you insert it in the thickest part of the chop, according to Food Safety.gov.

Let the pork chops rest for 3 minutes and then serve.

Items you will need
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 3 shallow bowls
  • All-purpose flour
  • Egg
  • Milk or water
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Oil (optional)
  • Tongs or spatula

Tips

  • Replace the egg in your liquid dredging mixture with buttermilk, milk, mayonnaise that's been thinned with a little water or milk, or yogurt. While an egg mixture is probably most commonly used, you do have other options; so, if you don't have an egg, don't sweat it.
  • Add fresh herbs or other seasonings to your breadcrumbs to add extra flavor to your chops. Some ideas include fresh or dried thyme, sage, basil, parsley and even some cayenne pepper for a little heat.

References

Photo Credits

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