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How to Clean an Infant Swing

by Sara Ipatenco, studioD

If you rely on your infant swing to help soothe and calm your baby when you're not able to hold her, you know how messy it can get. Between spit-ups, runny noses and diaper leaks, your infant swing probably needs a thorough cleaning on a fairly regular basis to help control the spread of germs.

Sprinkle baking soda on damp paper towel or clean cloth. Baking soda is a mild alkali that can make dirt dissolve in water -- and acts as an abrasive to help remove built-up grime, according to author Jeff Bredenberg in "2,001 Amazing Cleaning Secrets."

Scrub the plastic and metal parts of your baby's swing with the cloth, removing grime, crust and gunk as you go. The baking soda also deodorizes to rid the swing of any offending smells. You might have to rinse out the cloth and sprinkle it with baking soda several times until the plastic and metal parts of the swing are sparkling clean. Rinse them thoroughly with plain water once you remove the grime. Towel dry.

Repeat the cleaning process with the baking soda to wash the buckles and any toys attached to the baby swing. Alternatively, detach the toys from the swing and run them through the dishwasher with a mild, chemical-free detergent to clean and sanitize them.

Use a damp cloth sprinkled with baking soda to clean the fabric part of the swing. Scrub any stains or spills vigorously to remove them from the fabric. Rinse thoroughly with plain water when clean. Alternatively, you can remove the fabric part of the swing and toss it in the washing machine, using the same mild detergent you use to wash your infant's clothes. Air-dry the fabric rather than putting it in the dryer to prevent shrinkage.

Items you will need
  •  Warm water
  •  Baking soda
  •  Clean cloths
  •  Washing machine
  •  Mild laundry soap
  •  Towel


  • You can also use a chemical-free, liquid dish soap in place of baking soda.


  • According to Jeff Bredenberg, in "2,001 Amazing Cleaning Secrets," you shouldn't use a sponge to clean your baby's swing because a sponge can trap dangerous bacteria -- which can spread to other surfaces if you reuse it again.

About the Author

Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.

Photo Credits

  • George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images