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Ideas for a Citizenship Party

by Geoffrey St. Marie

For many immigrants to the United States, attaining the status of an official citizen represents a deep sense of accomplishment and belonging. There is no better way to recognize such an achievement than to throw the new citizen a party. This celebration incorporates patriotic themes and includes those who guided the new citizen through the process of achieving a secure, permanent and fruitful residency in the United States.

Decorative Touches

One thing that sets your party apart from a run-of-the-mill event is citizenship-oriented decor. One of the best symbols to use is the American flag. Have flags flying in the backyard or in the home, or even decorate the cake to look like the flag. An easy way to complement this theme is to line the party area with red, white and blue streamers.

Gifts

Citizenship is a monumental and poignant achievement -- one that the individual will not forget. Help him secure these memories through a scrapbook. Decorate and fill a scrapbook with photographs of the first trips he experienced in the country or the first friends he made. The new citizen could keep all of his official citizenship documents in the book as well. Whenever he wants to relive his exciting journey, he need only go to the bookshelf for memories and inspiration.

Significant Invites

Because of the significance of this event, the new citizen will no doubt want all her available family and friends to attend the party. In addition to these invitees, she may want to honor all the individuals who went out of their way to help her achieve her goal. If it is not a conflict of interest, someone at immigration services may want to attend. Try and find out if there was someone special who helped the citizen study the material for her exam or who tutored her in English, so they may share in the celebration.

Melting Pot

Remember that all immigrants who come to the United States bring their cultures and traditions with them. Your celebration of citizenship in the U.S. also should be a celebration of the new citizen's culture and the ability to preserve it. In this regard, cook as much of the person's traditional food as possible, mixing it with American cuisine. Include traditional music, dancing and other activities. Ideally, the United States is a nation that celebrates diversity.

About the Author

Geoffrey St. Marie began writing professionally in 2010, with his work focusing on topics in history, culture, politics and society. He received his Bachelor of Arts in European history from Central Connecticut State University and his Master of Arts in modern European history from Brown University.

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