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Child Care Provider & Parent Agreement

by Charlina Stewart

You thought you had to pay your youngster’s child care fees once a month. The provider insists you agreed to pay them every week. Now, your tyke is ousted from day care and you’re left scrambling for another provider. A signed child care provider and parent agreement can prevent this type of confusion because it outlines what the provider expects from you and vise versa.

Review the Agreement

A child care provider and parent agreement covers such things as payment terms, grounds for termination, illness policy, pick-up times and late fees. Read over the agreement carefully before you sign it. Get a copy of the signed document so you have something to refer back to just in case you forget portions of the agreement or if you have concerns the provider isn’t holding up her end of the contract.

Get Clarification

If there is a dispute and the provider decides to cart you to small claims court, you will be held to the terms of the contract. If there are things in the agreement you don’t understand, ask the day care provider to clarify them before you put your signature on it.

Get Modified Terms in Writing

Sometimes unique circumstances may warrant the child care provider to modify agreement terms before you enroll your tyke in the program. If your preschooler is on a special diet and you provide all of her meals, the provider may agree to a give you a cheaper rate because she does not have to supply food. Get any agreement you make outside of the original contract in writing. This way, there is documentation of a formal agreement between you and the provider.

Watch for Policy Changes

Child care providers can make modifications to their original agreements whenever they see fit. Your child’s caregiver may decide to raise her rates, change her business hours or change the payment terms. In the days leading up to the planned changes, the provider will likely give you an updated version of the contract to sign.

About the Author

Charlina Stewart has been a professional ghostwriter since 2004. Her articles have been published in the "Tyler Morning Telegraph," and on websites such as Education.com, Womb to Bloom, Suite 101, and eHow. Stewart has also had articles referenced in the Lamar University Early Child Development Center's Employee Handbook, and the Wilkes County Smart Start Newspaper Column.

Photo Credits

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