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Characteristics That Make a Strong Relationship

by S. Grey

Strong relationships are marked by a number of important characteristics. Communication, personal interests and other factors contribute to the creation and development of a strong bond. By incorporating important elements into your relationship, you increase your bond with your partner and decrease unnecessary problems. Strong relationships may take time and work, but a successful relationship is worth the effort.

Quality Communication

Quality communication is a significant marker of strong relationships. People in relationships must be able to communicate their feelings and needs. When people feel unable to express themselves, they may grow resentful. Strong relationships are marked by individuals willing and able to express themselves openly. Effective communication also means being able to work through conflict, something that should not be feared. Communication can also be nonverbal and include body language or posture. Affectionate body language, such as leaning toward a partner who is talking, speaks volumes without words.

Commitment

Commitment, which shows how partners invest in one another, is a powerful marker of a strong relationship. Relationships do not come effortlessly -- they take work and the desire to stay with your significant other for the long haul. This indicator of a strong relationship can be shown by willfully engaging with your partner through talk or other activities. Commitment also means resolving to work through problems rather than avoiding them.

Trust

When trust exists in a relationship, each knows that the other will be honest and open. Partners will not keep important secrets from each other and will hold themselves accountable. Trust also means knowing that your partner will respect and support you, even when you feel vulnerable. For instance, when you are open about your feelings, a trustworthy partner will affirm them and offer consolation. You should feel safe to express your feelings without fear of rejection.

Personal Interests

Having a strong relationship doesn't mean being attached at the hip -- having individual interests and friends means that partners are able to meet their own needs. Personal time allows you to keep other fulfilling relationships instead of relying exclusively on the intimate relationship for fulfillment. Less pressure is on partners to be everything for each other because there are multiple avenues through which they can meet their needs. When you are able to meet some of your own needs, you do not expect your partner to complete you.

About the Author

S. Grey has a Master of Science in counseling psychology from the University of Central Arkansas. He is also pursuing a PhD and has a love for psychology, comic books and social justice. He has been published in a text on social psychology and regularly presents research at regional psychology conferences.

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