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Can Following Up Too Much After an Interview Be Bad?

by Gina Scott

It's common to feel anxious after an interview. You may be tempted to contact your potential boss daily to see if you got the job, especially if it's for a position you really want. However, you may be shooting yourself in the foot if you go overboard with your follow-ups. Being too anxious can come across negatively.

You Don't Want to Appear Needy

Following up too frequently after an interview can come across as being needy. Remember that your potential boss likely knows little about you, so every action you take is information to him. Constantly checking in may say to him that you lack patience. It could also tell him that you are high maintenance. Neither one is a good quality to exhibit when trying to land a job. Instead, checking in periodically shows interest but also self-restraint.

Appearing Desperate Isn't Good, Either

Frequently contacting your potential employer about a job can come across as desperation. Even though you may actually be desperate for the job, you don't want it to appear that way. Desperation is a turnoff. It tells an employer that you don't have other options and may makes him wonder why you don't.

Showing a Lack of Common Sense

Following up too much after a job interview could show a lack of common sense. If you contact the interviewer every day for an answer, he may become irritated and feel you don't know when to stop bothering him. Again, you're showing your potential new supervisor who you are in all your interactions. Demonstrate to him that you are keen to social norms and you're likely to get further in landing the job.

Coming Across as Being Pushy

Checking in too frequently after an interview can appear overly aggressive. If you ask the interviewer when a decision will be made and you are told in a week, it's a good idea to wait the week before you start checking to see if they've chosen a candidate for the job. Inquiring about the decision too quickly could come across as an insensitivity to boundaries. Let your interviewer catch a breath before you start regularly asking for updates.

Striking a Balance

If you are extremely interested after your interview, it's okay to let your potential employer know of your excitement about the job. With modern-day communication, there are several ways to stay in contact with your potential employer. A thank-you note or regular email check in should get the message across that you hope you're offered the position.

About the Author

Based in the Midwest, Gina Scott has been writing professionally since 2008. She has worked in real estate since 2004 and has expertise in pop culture and health-related topics. She has also self-published a book on how to overcome chronic health conditions. Scott holds a Master of Arts in higher-education administration from Ball State University.

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