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Can You Drink Raspberry Tea If You Are Nursing?

by Kathryn Hatter, studioD

Drinking red raspberry tea can have significant benefits during breastfeeding. High in calcium and iron, red raspberry tea can help tone the uterus in preparation for childbirth, but the benefits do not stop with the birth of the baby, according to the website of Fletcher Allen Health Care, with the University of Vermont.

Postpartum Period

During the postpartum period, uterine involution occurs, which involves the uterus slowly shrinking down to its pre-pregnancy size. Breastfeeding can aid in uterine involution because it encourages uterine contractions, which helps speed the process. Drinking red raspberry tea can also be beneficial during the postpartum period because it helps to tone the uterus and it may help regulate the mother's postpartum hormones.

Milk Supply

Galactogogues are herbs or medicines that enhance milk supply, advises the Ask Dr. Sears website. The mineral content of red raspberry tea might help increase a mother's milk supply, making it an herbal galactogogue, according to certified clinical nutritionist Jessica Stamm. The effectiveness of red raspberry tea may vary, and not all experts agree about milk supply claims. Often, just the process of taking the time to make yourself a cup of tea and sitting down to drink it can be beneficial for increasing your milk supply because you are pampering yourself and resting.

Dosage and Forms of Red Raspberry Leaf

You might take red raspberry leaf as a tea, in capsule form or as a tincture with an alcohol base, states childbirth educator Jane Palmer, with the Pregnancy, Birth and Beyond website. Tablets generally contain 300 to 400 mg of red raspberry leaf each. Check with your physician for recommendations for a safe dosage of red raspberry tea while breastfeeding.

Cautions and Side Effects

Red raspberry leaf tea does not have serious side effects associated with it. You could experience nausea and diarrhea, especially if you drink the tea in large quantities. Taking a tincture while breastfeeding will involve consuming alcohol, and some tinctures have higher alcohol concentrations than others.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

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