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Can I Cook Veal Like a Pork Chop?

by Natalie Smith

If you can cook a pork chop, you can cook a veal chop. Despite the higher cost, you do not need any special knowledge of cooking techniques to create a flavorful veal chop meal that your entire family will love. Grill them, saute them, bake them or even fry the veal for a juicy main course.

Types of Veal Chops

Veal chops come in two basic varieties: rib chops or loin chops. Rib chops contain meat from the loin, whereas loin chops contain meat from the loin and the tenderloin, which is a little more tender and juicy. Both types provide high-quality meat and can be prepared in similar ways, so buy whichever you prefer.

Similarities to Pork Chops

Prepare veal chops in any way that you might prepare a pork chop, with a few adjustments for cooking time. Veal chops can be cooked with any of the seasonings that you would use on a pork chop, such as a garlic seasoning, salad dressing mix or mild barbecue rub. Similar to pork chops, veal chops are juicy and tender with a savory edge of fat on the edge of each chop.

Differences

Veal chops tend to be much thicker than pork chops. The typical veal chop is 1 to 1 1/2-inches thick, whereas pork chips are generally 1/2 inch to 3/4-inch thick. As a result, the cooking time tends to be longer. However, you do not have to cook veal chops until they are well-done, as you would a pork chop. Instead, think of the cooking temperature as you would a steak. You can cook a veal chop anywhere from rare to well-done.

Tips and Serving Suggestions

The flavor of a veal chop is more subtle than pork chops, so you may wish to choose seasonings that are flavorful but that enhance rather than overpower the taste of the veal. Examples of flavors that go well with veal are a garlic rub or red wine marinade. Serve the veal chops with any side that you might serve with steak or a beef roast, such as roasted vegetables, a baked potato or a crisp salad with a light ranch dressing.

About the Author

Natalie Smith is a technical writing professor specializing in medical writing localization and food writing. Her work has been published in technical journals, on several prominent cooking and nutrition websites, as well as books and conference proceedings. Smith has won two international research awards for her scholarship in intercultural medical writing, and holds a PhD in technical communication and rhetoric.