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Can You Have Champagne When Nursing?

by Kathryn Hatter

If a celebration comes along while you are breastfeeding your baby, you may wonder whether it is safe to drink champagne while nursing. Although consuming large amounts of alcohol during breastfeeding could negatively impact your child, a nominal amount of champagne should not have adverse effects on your little one.

Champagne Alcohol Content

Check the bottle of champagne to learn the alcohol content of the beverage. Although champagne varies according to brand, the average alcohol percentage is 12 percent, according to the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. Knowing the alcohol content enables you to decide how much champagne you want to consume.

Safe Consumption

Having one glass of champagne falls within safe parameters, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics' HealthyChildren.org website. The AAP recommends moderation with alcohol consumption during breastfeeding, however. Drinking frequently or drinking more than one glass could have a negative effect on your milk supply and on your infant. As long as you remain sober enough to drive, you can safely breastfeed.

Breastfeeding after a Drink

After you drink a glass of champagne, the alcohol enters your bloodstream and your breast milk, states the Government of Ontario Best Start website. Alcohol content peaks in blood and breast milk between 30 and 60 minutes after consuming a drink, states international board certified lactation consultant Kelly Bonyata, with the KellyMom website. Your breast milk alcohol level will match whatever your current blood alcohol level is after consuming the champagne. Slowly, after drinking the champagne, your body will metabolize the alcohol and your blood alcohol level will go down. Your breast milk will not hold the alcohol content in it until you feed your baby or pump; the alcohol level will dissipate at the same rate as your blood alcohol level goes down.

Alcohol Effects on Baby

You might notice your baby seeming slightly drowsy after consuming a glass of champagne. Your baby might also notice a different taste or odor in the breast milk. Overconsumption of alcohol during breastfeeding could result in a decrease in milk supply, changes in your baby’s sleep patterns and motor development impairment.

About the Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.

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