our everyday life

How to Bread and Deep-Fry Oysters

by Brynne Chandler, studioD

Crisp, golden breading gently cocooning meaty, salt-kissed oysters brings a taste of the beach to any meal. Featured on many high-dollar menus, deep-fried oysters are not difficult to make at home. The technique is no different from frying chicken and takes far less time. Serve them as an appetizer or add coleslaw, corn on the cob and a crisp green salad for a succulent and simple taste of summer all year ‘round.

Coat the bottom of a pie plate with a small amount of cornstarch.

Crack an egg into a second pie plate. Add enough milk to fill the pie plate to a depth of about 1/2 inch or so. Season the milk with salt and pepper and any other seasonings you prefer, such as paprika. Whisk the egg, milk and seasonings together until the mixture is creamy and slightly thickened.

Fill a third pie plate with 3/4 inch or so of breading. Use flour, cornmeal, a mixture of the two, plain or panko bread crumbs, cornmeal or a commercially packaged fish-fry breading.

Rinse the oysters thoroughly to ensure that they are free of sand, grit and any pieces of shell. Let them drain in a colander, but do not dry them.

Roll the damp oysters one at a time in the cornstarch to help the breading stick to them.

Dip the oysters in the seasoned milk-and-egg mixture and then roll them in your breading, coating them thoroughly.

Pour 2 inches or so of oil into a deep skillet or fill a deep fryer to its fill line. Heat the oil until a pinch of breading tossed into it sizzles, which should be about 365 degrees Fahrenheit.

Fry the oysters until they are crisp and golden on all sides, turning them once while they cook if you’re using a skillet.

Drain the oysters on a plate lined with a double thickness of paper towels and serve them while they are piping hot.

Items you will need
  •  Pie plates, 3
  •  Cornstarch
  •  Egg
  •  Milk
  •  Salt
  •  Pepper
  •  Seasoning
  •  Whisk
  •  Breading
  •  Colander
  •  Canola or vegetable oil
  •  Skillet or deep-fryer
  •  Tongs
  •  Plate
  •  Paper towels


  • Serve deep-fried oysters with a choice of dipping sauces such as cocktail, horseradish or tartar sauce and ranch or bleu cheese dressing.


  • Do not crowd the skillet when frying oysters because it lowers the temperature of the oil and results in a far less-crispy coating.

About the Author

Emmy-award nominated screenwriter Brynne Chandler is a single mother of three who divides her time between professional research and varied cooking, fitness and home & gardening enterprises. A running enthusiast who regularly participates in San Francisco's Bay to Breakers run, Chandler works as an independent caterer, preparing healthy, nutritious meals for Phoenix area residents.

Photo Credits

  • Eising/Photodisc/Getty Images