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How to Find a Boyfriend in Your 30s

by Andrea Schneider

Being in your 30s and maneuvering the dating world to find an ideal significant other is different than it was in your earlier years. In your 30s, you are more likely to be working full time, or hold multiple jobs, be going back to school or a combination of these and more. Finding the time to balance the adult world with the dating world can be tricky. Learning how to take a step back may open the door to more ways to find the partner that you want.

Create an online dating profile. There are a variety of dating sites for people in their 30s that focus on specific interests, including religions, ethnicities, ages, hobbies, pet interests and more. In a study published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2006, Guenter J. Hitsch and colleagues reported that 36 percent of men and 39 percent of women with online dating profiles were "hoping to start a long term relationship." Take the time to explore the different sites, as there may be a new world of potential suitors that you would not otherwise meet in your everyday routine.

Do something different. If you have been trying to meet new people and have been unsuccessful, then something is not working. It likely has little to do with you, and everything to do with where you are going and whom you are meeting. Think about what you like to do and make a list of these activities. Search for meet-up groups, singles outings, book readings at local coffee shops, cooking events, meet and greets for dogs and their owners at the local dog park, or anything else that differs from your normal routine that has something to do with the list of interests and activities you created.

Take time for yourself and do things that make you happy. If you look like you are having a blast out with your friends, laughing at the dog park when your dog rolls through the mud, or reading an interesting magazine in the bookstore, you may find you're a magnet for people that are seeking out a partner who looks happy, confident, and can have a good time.

About the Author

Andrea Schneider received a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of Florida. She is also completing a master's degree in marriage and family therapy from Nova Southeastern University. Schneider has contributed to the "Journal of Illness, Coping and Loss."

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