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How to Boil Potatoes So They Can Be Frozen & Preserved

by Jenny Harrington, studioD

Freezing potatoes makes them last longer, while also minimizing preparation and cooking time later. This is handy if you find potatoes on sale or your garden produced a bountiful harvest. Partially cooking, or blanching, the potatoes prevents discoloration and helps them retain their flavor longer in the freezer. Waxy red and gold varieties freeze best, suffering less flavor and texture decline compared to the large baking varieties. Freeze potatoes whole, cubed or sliced, depending on how you plan to use them later.

Wash the potatoes in running water, scrubbing them with a vegetable brush. Peel the potatoes, if you wish. Leave small 2- to 3-inch-diameter new potatoes whole, or cut larger potatoes into 1-inch or smaller cubes.

Bring a pot of water to a full boil over high heat. Set a large bowl of ice water near the stove.

Add the potatoes to the boiling water and bring the water back to a full boil. Boil whole potatoes for 8 minutes, or small small cubed potatoes for 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the potatoes from the boiling water with a slotted spoon and immediately transfer them to the ice water to cool them quickly. Cool the potatoes for about 8 minutes, or until completely cool to the touch.

Drain the potatoes in a colander then pat them dry with a paper towel. Pack the dry potatoes into a plastic freezer bag. Press out the air, seal the bag closed and place it in a 0-degree Fahrenheit freezer.

Items you will need
  •  Vegetable brush
  •  Potato peeler
  •  Knife
  •  Pot
  •  Bowl
  •  Ice
  •  Slotted spoon
  •  Colander
  •  Paper towels
  •  Freezer storage bags


  • Although potatoes won't spoil when kept frozen, the flavor and texture start to change over time. Use frozen potatoes within a few weeks for the best flavor, and dispose of any remaining frozen potatoes after 10 to 12 months.

About the Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images