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How to Become a Quality Manager

by Clayton Browne, studioD

Quality assurance managers, or quality control managers, are responsible for maintaining specified quality standards at a workplace, often including supervising a team of quality control inspectors. Until the late 20th century, most Q/A inspectors and managers did not need a lot of education, as on-the-job training sufficed for simply judging products on a pass/fail basis. Quality assurance technology, however, has grown more advanced over the last few decades, and the more complex devices and processes used for quality assurance in many industries require a higher level of education. This means 21st-century employers seek Q/A managers with relevant industry certifications and college degrees.

Earn an associate or bachelor's degree in quality control management, business administration or a related field. You can also become a quality manager with a technical degree in industries such as chemical manufacturing, industrial machinery and semiconductors.

Apply for entry-level quality assurance specialist or inspector positions in your area. Complete the on-the-job training program and accept all additional responsibilities. Earn any relevant industry certifications, such as the American Society for Quality's quality technician, quality inspector or quality process analyst certifications.

Work as a Q/A specialist for at least three or four years to gain experience and seniority. Take the time to learn about all standards relevant to your industry. Quality manager positions typically require four to five years' professional experience in addition to educational requirements.

When you meet the experience requirements, apply for quality assurance or control manager positions at your current job and elsewhere. Unless you live in a major city, you might have to relocate to find an ideal Q/A manager position.


  • Start developing your personal and professional networks in college. Networking will give you an inside track for many jobs, especially management positions, and will give you a shot at jobs you might not even have heard about otherwise.

About the Author

Clayton Browne has been writing professionally since 1994. He has written and edited everything from science fiction to semiconductor patents to dissertations in linguistics, having worked for Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Steck-Vaughn and The Psychological Corp. Browne has a Master of Science in linguistic anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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