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How to Bake an Eggless Cake With a Store-Bought Cake Mix

by Deborah Lundin, studioD

Whether you are looking for a healthier option for your dessert treats or baking a cake for a vegan friend, you can use a variety of egg substitutions with a store-bought cake mix. Substitutions may alter or slightly affect the final taste and texture of your cake, so you may want to experiment to find which substitutions work best for you. For most substitutions, you will add all the ingredients the cake mix calls for, mixing in alternative ingredients only for the eggs.

Puree fresh, frozen or canned fruits in a blender or food processor until smooth. Add 3 tablespoons of fruit puree in place of each egg your cake mix calls for. Combine ingredients, pour into pan and bake as directed.

Measure 1/4 cup of yogurt or soy yogurt for every egg your cake mix calls for. Add the yogurt to the other ingredients and combine as directed. Pour the batter into a cake pan and bake as directed.

Measure out 1/2 cup of buttermilk for every egg the recipe calls for and add to the dry mix. If your cake mix calls for water, reduce the water by a couple of teaspoons to start and add them back to reach the desired consistency. Mix the ingredients and bake as directed.

Items you will need
  •  Fruit (fresh, frozen or canned)
  •  Blender or food processor
  •  Measuring spoons and cups
  •  Yogurt
  •  Buttermilk


  • For a substitution of all the ingredients listed on your cake mix box, consider using a 12-ounce can of your favorite soda. Allow the soda to sit at room temperature before mixing. Place the dry cake mix in a mixing bowl and simply pour in the entire can of soda. Mix until all clumps are gone, pour into your cake pan and bake as directed.
  • Using fruit puree can alter the flavor and taste of your cake. Choose fruits that complement your cake mix flavor.


  • Making substitutions in cake recipes can often shorten the necessary baking time. Check your cake a few minutes before the recommended cooking time by inserting a toothpick into the center of the cake. When it comes out clean, cooking is complete.

About the Author

Deborah Lundin is a professional writer with more than 20 years of experience in the medical field and as a small business owner. She studied medical science and sociology at Northern Illinois University. Her passions and interests include fitness, health, healthy eating, children and pets.

Photo Credits

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