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How to Bake a Cake Using Egg Whites & Applesauce

by Anne Kinsey

Give your favorite recipes a low-fat makeover by substituting egg whites for full eggs and replacing part of the oil with applesauce. While substituting applesauce for all of the oil works in some recipes, in others it makes the cake too moist or drastically changes the texture. To make a recipe healthier without messing with the cake's texture, it is best to substitute no more than half of the oil in your recipe with applesauce. Your cake will taste so good that nobody will ever be the wiser.

Calculate how many egg whites you need in order to make your cake. Read the recipe and multiply the eggs by two. For example, if your recipe calls for two eggs, you need four egg whites. If your recipe calls for three eggs, you need six egg whites.

Separate the egg whites and yolks. Decide what to do with the egg yolks, whether you use them to make custard or sponge cake, freeze them for later use or discard them. Set aside the egg whites for your cake.

Calculate how much applesauce and oil you need for your cake by dividing the amount of oil called for in the recipe by two. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cups of oil, you will need 3/4 cup oil and 3/4 cup applesauce. If your recipe calls for 1 cup of oil, you will need 1/2 cup oil and 1/2 cup applesauce.

Follow your cake recipe as it is written. If your recipe calls for room temperature ingredients, ensure that your egg whites and applesauce are not too hot or too cold prior to mixing. Some recipes call for whipped egg whites. In this case, whip half of the egg whites to medium peaks and leave half unwhipped. Add the oil and applesauce when the recipe calls for mixing in the oil, normally with all of the wet ingredients. Bake your cake at the specified temperature and for the length of time listed in the original recipe.

About the Author

Anne Kinsey has been a writer for 10 years, with her writing published in print newsletters, as well as websites including eHow and LIVESTRONG. She is also a minister and violinist holding a B.A. in religion and African American studies, and a M.Div. in pastoral counseling.

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