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How to Ask a Girl Out During Your Freshman Year

by Anthony Oster

To some, asking a girl out in your freshman year can be viewed as either a blessing or a curse. Being at a new school can give you the chance to redesign your image and approach girls that you may not have in the past, while this may also come at the cost of not having the social support or status that you did at your previous school. Though with every attempt at asking a girl out comes the risk of rejection, she can't say yes if you don't have the confidence to give it a try.

Make a Connection

Meeting people during your freshman year is not always easy. Look for organic connections, such as sharing classes and being involved in the same activities or group projects to open up the lines of communication with a potential date. After making a connection, ask for her number. If you need an excuse, you can always fall back on sharing notes or getting together for a study session as a reason to exchange numbers.

Get Involved

Utilize your freshman year to the fullest by getting involved in numerous extracurricular activities and student organizations. Trying out for a sport, joining the band and participating in the yearbook club are all ways to build your reputation on campus, while also developing natural relationships with girls at school. Joining organizations and attending activities that attract the types of girls that you are interested in can increase your chances of meeting someone who shares your interests and may be interested in dating you. Remember, your reputation from your former school does not have to dictate who you are today. Take a step outside of your comfort zone and engage in activities that you might not have before to meet new people.

Be School Spirited

If you can't find a way to approach the cute girl in your chemistry class, just wait until your school hosts an event that can give you an excuse to ask her out. Football games, dances and charity events provide opportunities for you to ask a girl out on a date without having to awkwardly make plans. You can also play off of the thrill of the game-winning touchdown to ask the girl sitting in the stadium behind you if she wants to celebrate after the game.

Consider Your Best Options

Who you ask out may play a more crucial role in your dating life's success than how you approach each girl. According to a study conducted by researchers at George Washington University, popularity, physical attraction and social desirability play a significant role in date selection. Furthermore, men in the study tended to prefer younger women, while women tended to pursue and prefer attention from older men. What this suggests is that even if you share classes and common interests with a girl, if you are not seen as physically attractive to her, or deemed to be socially undesirable, she may avoid your advances. Take an objective look at your social circle and try to approach similarly attractive and socially desirable girls to increase the odds of her accepting your offer of a date.

Just Ask

One dilemma that many guys find themselves faced with is the concept of the "Friend Zone." To some, the friend zone is an inescapable nightmare dimension in which you hold feelings for a girl who only sees you as a friend. You can set yourself apart from other guys destined to enter the friend zone by simply taking a chance and asking a girl out early in your relationship, rather than waiting for a friendship to form. Even if she declines your offer, you will be seen as someone who has shown romantic interest in her, rather than a strictly platonic interest.

About the Author

Anthony Oster is a licensed professional counselor who earned his Master of Science in counseling psychology at the University of Southern Mississippi. He has served as a writer and lead video editor for a small, South Louisiana-based video production company since 2007. Oster is the co-owner of a professional photography business and advises the owner on hardware and software acquisitions for the company.

Photo Credits

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