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How to Apply Fairy Makeup for Little Girls

by Michelle Powell-Smith, studioD

From fairy princesses to tree fairies, nearly every little girl enthralled with the enchanting creatures could use a little magic in her life. Fairy makeup can be simple or complex, but the basic application strategies are the same, whether you're creating a dainty flower fairy or an icy fairy queen. Although you can add fairy wings and a magic wand, fairy makeup will add sparkle and shine, even if you don't accessorize.

Choose two coordinating colors for the fairy makeup design on the eyes, one lighter and one darker. For a tree fairy, opt for shades of green. An ice fairy might want shades of blue, or you can match colors to your fairy's wings, tutu or wand.

Apply the lighter shade over the eye area with a makeup sponge, creating a wing shape that extends up and above the eyebrow and ends in a rounded curve or point below the eye.

Add dimension to the outer edges of the fairy eye makeup with the darker shade and a medium-sized paintbrush. Blend the colors with a sponge to create an even flow of color from one to the other, working from the inner corner toward the outer corner.

Trace the shape with a small brush and white face paint. Add delicate curlicues and tendrils around the edges of the face paint.

Touch up or clean up any mistakes with a baby wipe or makeup remover and a cotton ball or swab.

Lightly brush glitter powder or spread glitter gel over the finished fairy makeup. Add a sparkly lip color to finish the fairy's magical new look.

Items you will need
  •  Face paint palette
  •  Glitter gel or powders
  •  Face-painting sponge
  •  Small and large paintbrushes
  •  Baby wipes or makeup remover and cotton balls or swabs


  • Save time if you're painting fairy faces at a party by using disposable brushes and sponges or having enough inexpensive brushes to use clean ones for each child.
  • Blend contrasting colors into the fairy eye makeup for a more elaborate fairy.


  • Only use skin-safe glitters. Glitter sold for crafts is not safe for use on the skin and could irritate little eyes.

About the Author

With a master's degree in art history from the University of Missouri-Columbia, Michelle Powell-Smith has been writing professionally for more than a decade. An avid knitter and mother of four, she has written extensively on a wide variety of subjects, including education, test preparation, parenting, crafts and fashion.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision/Photodisc/Getty Images