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Appetizers With Sirloin Beef

by Bridgette Redman

Sirloin beef is a versatile ingredient that you can use for a variety of appetizers with flavors from around the world. When you use beef for appetizers, it is common to cut it into cubes or slice it into thin strips. The beef can then be roasted, grilled, braised or sauteed, and it can more easily be made into bite-sized, kid-friendly foods. Appetizers can range from something as simple as beef bits served with creamy dip to a tapas dish that features distinct flavors and vegetables that will entice even your picky eaters to dig in.

American

Sirloin beef is a traditional British cut that American chefs have been using in appetizers for years. A simple, popular appetizer is a strip of sirloin beef on a skewer marinated in barbeque sauce and grilled. Sirloin beef can also be cut into cubes and put on skewers with vegetables such as tomatoes, potatoes and onions to make kebobs. These are especially tasty when served with such sauces as honey and mustard or your favorite creamy dressing or dip. Kebobs can be grilled or baked and served as an appetizer.

French

Technically, there is no sirloin in French cooking. In France, the tenderloin is removed in one piece and is then boned, which does not leave the sirloin intact the way it is served in America. That said, there are French appetizers using loin beef or Contre Filet. French beef is most often served with bernaise sauce, red wine sauces or brandy sauces. For French-style appetizers, try sauteing thinly sliced sirloin beef in dry dressing and seasoning mix and wrapping it around artichoke hearts, mushrooms or steamed vegetable chunks and serve with a complementary creamy dressing or dip. You can also spread garlic or parsley butter on freshly-baked French bread slices, lay a strip of warm sirloin beef on the bread and then top it with a sauteed asparagus tip, buttered pea pod or baby carrot.

Asian

Use sirloin beef to create a variety of Asian-style appetizers. Slice the beef thinly and blanch it in beef or veal stock to create Japanese beef salad rolls. Roll the blanched beef around thin strips of carrot, zucchini and alfalfa sprouts, and serve with savory creamy dip. Grind the sirloin and mix it with dry dressing and dip mix for seasoning. Shape the meat mixture onto skewers for grilling, and serve with spicy dip as beef satays. Make beef yakitori with eggplant by marinating beef sirloin in soy sauce and sauteing the beef in sesame oil over high heat. Sear slices of eggplant and then put the beef on skewers between two slices of eggplant.

Latin

Latin beef dishes emphasize flavorings such as hot peppers, cumin, lime and cilantro. Appetizers can be served with salsas, beans, rice and tortillas. Cut sirloin beef into strips, marinate them in an orange juice and garlic marinade, saute them and serve it with glazed plantains and black beans for a Cuban-style appetizer. For a different flavor, dry rub the beef with dressing and seasoning mix and then grill it. Wrap the grilled beef in a tortilla with roasted chayote squash and tomatillos.

Fondue

Restaurants such as The Melting Pot have brought fondue back out of its 70s obscurity and reintroduced it into the home as an appetizer and party food. Heat oil for cooking sirloin beef or create a robust broth to boil the meat in. The successful fondue then serves up a variety of dips for the meat. Provide a mix of tastes for your dips such as a creamy horseradish sauce, a ginger apple sauce or a creamy mustard dip. Mix bleu cheese dressing with cottage cheese. Whip up a hollandaise dip. All of these flavors can complement sirloin beef well and appeal to a variety of guest tastes.

References

  • "Small Plates: Appetizers as Meals"; Marguerite Marceau Henderson; 2006
  • "Mastering the Art of French Cooking"; Julia Child, et al; 2001
  • "Asian Tapas: Small Bites, Big Flavors"; Christophe Megel, et al; 2004
  • Best Fondue: Fondue Dipping Sauce - Beef
  • "The New Steak;" Cree LeFavour; 2008

Resources

  • "Steak: One Man's Search for the World's Tastiest Piece of Beef"; March Schatzker; 2010
  • The Bon Appetit Cookbook; Barbara Fairchild; 2006

About the Author

As a professional writer since 1985, Bridgette Redman's career has included journalism, educational writing, book authoring and training. She's worked for daily newspapers, an educational publisher, websites, nonprofit associations and individuals. She is the author of two blogs, reviews live theater and has a weekly column in the "Lansing State Journal." She has a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Michigan State University.

Photo Credits

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