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How to Find an Adopted Child for Free

by Sarah Meem

Finding an adopted child may seem like an impossible task, especially if you are up against sealed adoption records. However, with the proper research, help and dedication, it may be possible for you to be reunited with your child. Most organizations require fees for their services however, sometimes they offer pro-bono exceptions.

Go to Howtoinvestigate.com to find adoption records availability by state. Every state has a different regulation regarding public access of adoption records. Most states require a court order to access adoption records. However, some states offer the records for public access after the child has turned 18 or 21, depending on the state.

Hire a search angel, a free service provided by someone experienced in searching for people in specific states. Search angels can be found on The-seeker.com. The website also offers a public forum, so first check to see if anyone is looking for you.

Acquire a birth date search by gender for the particular state in which you believe the adoption happened. More likely than not, the family will still be in the same state so do not give up if all you know is his birth date and birth place.

Interview anyone who was around you during the adoption period. OmniTrace search experts advise parents, especially mothers, looking for their adopted children, to ask people they knew at the time of adoption for details. They state that after working with many birth mothers, they have observed that birth mothers were often under so much stress at the time of adoption that they might not remember details about the adoptive family. As experts, they suggest asking parents, friends, the doctor and lawyer you had during the time of adoption. The people may not know any details but there is always a chance that someone around you observed more than you or kept records you did not.

Use social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace or Twitter, and ask others to pass along your search. This is highly recommended with Twitter. News can travel fast.

Tips

  • Do not just show up unannounced on someone's door.
  • The adoptee might not know he is adopted.
  • Talk to a family counselor before embarking on the search.

Warnings

  • Be aware that an adoptee might be unwilling to meet with a birth parent.
  • Be aware that the adoptee's new parents might not be comfortable with the adoptee meeting his birth parents.

About the Author

Sarah Meem began writing in 2007. She specializes in coverage of Middle East topics, human trafficking and human rights issues. Meem has a Bachelor of Arts in international studies and Arabic from the University of North Carolina. She is pursuing a master's degree in social service administration from the University of Chicago.

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