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Activities for the Blind: 18 Months Old to 3 Years Old

by Tara Shore, studioD

Toddlers who are blind need activities to stimulate their minds and help them develop motor skills and the ability to solve problems. Some of those activities and games likely will be different than those that kids with sight participate in, but they still are focusing on the same general results. You want your 18-month to 3-year-old to be able to function and develop the skills that are the foundation for more complex tasks later on in life.

Senses Activity Area

Toddlers that are visually impaired benefit from sensory play area. Because they they lack one of their stronger senses, blind children need to build up other senses. If you set up a safe space with toys and items that deal with touch and sound, your child will focus on those senses and gain experience.


Whether your child is crawling or walking, he will benefit from guidance in how to do it safely. Setting up a course aids his ability to navigate and forces him to learn to feel his way through carefully. For crawlers, you can use pillows or play tunnels to map out a course. Walkers will need something taller such as the stools or couch cushions stood on end.

Listening to Sounds and Voices

Listening is a skill that a blind child will rely on heavily in life. Provide time for them to concentrate on this sense with focused activities. Set up a sound corner where she can listen to various sounds through headphones. Include music, and urban and nature sounds with identification and recorded messages from family members. Also, give her toys and safe items so she can make sounds of her own.

Explore the World

Just because your child is visually impaired doesn't mean he is fragile. Don't forget to take him out into the world so he can use all the senses at his disposal. Go on walks through the park or down the street, and tell him the different sounds as they come up. Enjoy a day at the playground having a picnic and swinging. He will benefit from the experience emotionally and physically.

About the Author

Tara Shore holds a Bachelor of Science in business finance and has written for online publications since 2007. She has professional experience in banking, accounting, travel and teaching. Shore is also a master gardener and a travel agent.

Photo Credits

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